Tackle Reviews

X Zone Lures Adrenaline Bug Review

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We’re getting close to a major soft-plastic bite around much of the country; it won’t be long until piles of baits litter the floor of my boat. While I’m still fairly new to the X Zone Lures lineup, I’ve been fishing one of their baits lately that has really grabbed my attention. It has proven to be a versatile option that is going to be a big-time producer for me this year. 

The Adrenaline Bug has been catching a bunch of fish for me lately and I wanted to share my experiences with everyone. There’s a little more to it than initially meets the eye. 

(1 of 4)

Super soft plastic

I think anglers are conditioned these days to think especially soft baits lack durability; I’m certainly guilty of that thought process. I like the added action that a super soft formula provides, but it can become irritating and expensive over time. 

The Adrenaline Bug, however, is quite soft but still maintains plenty of durability to last for several fish catches. Both the body and appendages are soft, but the head of the bait stays on a hook well and rarely slides down the shank, even after repeated skip casts to overhanging cover. I took this bait to a local pond and caught an easy average of four to five bass per bait. 

I’ve also noticed something pretty interesting: The bass are holding onto this bait for a really long time. We’ve had a lot of random weather fronts sweep through our area lately, which has resulted in a lot of short strikes and odd bass behavior. This has been one of baits I’ve relied on, however, because they’ll suck it in and swim with it for several feet before I have an opportunity to set the hook. With that being said, my hookup ratio has been outstanding throughout my testing. 

(2 of 4)

The claws float

These types of baits rarely have floating claws. I own a lot of them and I tend to use them when I’m looking for a subtle, gliding action because to be honest – they don’t provide a lot of movement. The X Zone Lures Adrenaline Bug, however, has a really enticing action in a small package. 

I’ve played around with this bait a lot in shallow, clear water to see how it reacts to different rod movements and presentations. It glides and slightly spirals as it falls, but as it reaches the bottom, the claws will float for several seconds. As I’m sure you’ve heard in the past, this is the natural defensive posture of a live crawfish. It gives me a lot more confidence knowing that my bait isn’t lying sideways on the bottom like a chunk of plastic. Even between your rod twitches and pops, this bait looks great underwater. 

(3 of 4)

Body profile makes skip casts easyT

I skip docks all year long, so I’ve developed an affinity for streamlined soft plastics that effortlessly slide under cover. When I pull up to a dock, I’m looking to make four or five key casts without making any unnatural noises, so this is a big consideration when I’m buying new plastics. 

This bait skips like a dream thanks to its flat body shape. Whether you’re pitching or making sidearmed skip casts, the added surface area allows the Adrenaline Bug to skip across the surface without any hassle. It doesn’t break the surface tension easily either, which allows it to skip several times before coming to a stop. It’s not unusual for me to thread this bait on the back of a jig and skip from the front of a dock all the way to the seawall. 

(4 of 4)

The colors look great

It’s obvious that whoever designed this bait is a shallow-water power fisherman; someone after my own heart. You’re not going to find a bunch of hokey colors that catch fisherman. Instead, you’ll notice some of the old-school staples that have always and will always catch big bass. Whether you’re fishing clear or dirty water, you’re going to find a good-looking color in this lineup. 

My personal favorites have been Purple Shadow, Okeechobee Craw and Watermelon Red. I’ve caught plenty of bass on all three colors and will be ordering more soon. 

If you want to see more of the colors or grab a few packs to try for yourself, the Adrenaline Bug is available here