Take that weight peg off your Texas rig

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I’m not going to type a long diatribe about the effectiveness of a Texas rig. That’s boring and everyone knows it gets bites all year long. I will suggest, however, that you remove the weight peg from your lightweight Texas rig. I know pegging ’em is all the rage in recent years, but you’re going to get more bites from the back deck if you let your tungsten weight freely slide up and down your line.

When you do this, you’re likely showing the bass a very different look than your boater is. With an unpegged weight, your weight will actually hit the bottom first before your soft plastic slowly catches up with it. This can work wonderfully, especially when you’re targeting cold-water bass. Instead of your soft plastic dropping to the bottom like a rock, this allows it to slow a bit faller and in a less abrupt and threatening manner.

I keep this rig pretty simple. I like to use a Zoom Zlinky, Zoom Ultravibe Speed Worm or X Zone Adrenaline Bug with an 1/8-ounce tungsten weight on 15-pound fluorocarbon. An all-purpose medium-heavy casting rod will do just fine as well. Don’t be afraid to make the same casts as your boater when you’re using this technique, either. While I would normally advise against that, this finesse-type Texas rig can do some serious damage fished behind someone who’s using a more power-fishing technique.

As I mentioned earlier, being a co-angler can be frustrating. Personally speaking, it drives me nuts not being able to be in control of things. But as I’ve gotten older and honestly, probably a little more mature, I’ve been able to relax a little more and just enjoy the time fishing and cutting up with my buddies. The tips we discussed will absolutely help you catch more bass but take it from a stubborn redneck… you have to stay patient for any of this to work. Don’t get down in the floor of the boat and start constantly retying everything and getting spun out. Have confidence in yourself and in these tactics and you’re going to become a better co-angler.