Get a bigger tackle tray

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I’ve mentioned several times in the past that I try to make my tackle storage as modular as possible. Essentially, I want to be able to use the smallest tackle trays I can so I can easily take things in and out of my boat or quickly grab a few boxes to jump in a buddy’s boat at the last minute.

I have tried this thought process with frogs until I’m blue in the face and man… it just doesn’t work for me. I’ve tried to put my frogs in smaller tackle trays in the name of mobility or accessibility but I just can’t get on board with it. Whenever I try to stuff a bunch of frogs into a too-small tray, I end up with crimped legs and warped bodies; both of which can significantly hinder the action and effectiveness of your favorite frogs. You let those frogs sit in a cramped tackle tray for days at a time in the Georgia heat and I can guarantee you’re going to burn through some money.

Everyone is going to have their own preferred storage method or tackle tray for frogs; there are a lot of options out there for you. But I started tinkering with the Flambeau ZERUST MAX Crank Bank and although it was initially intended for crankbait storage, it’s a legit option for safely storing a bunch of frogs. If you have a bunch of average-sized frogs (i.e. SPRO Poppin’ Frog 60 or something of similar size) you can fit 72 frogs in a very small and compact box.

The frogs are stored vertically with this box which, in my experience, has drastically reduced any crimping of the legs of warping of the bodies. You certainly don’t have to buy this particular box but at the very least, make sure you don’t make the same mistake I made for a few years. Don’t cram a bunch of frogs into a smaller tackle tray. Give ’em some room and pay a couple extra bucks for a larger box to avoid premature damage to the frogs.