Hard Baits

Strike King Mega Dawg Review

Jason Sealock
Strike King announced the new Mega Dawg at the end of 2018 and it's been a bold new addition to their proven stable of bass fishing lures. But based on the success of lures like the 10XD relative to their 6XD anglers and 8.0 Squarebill compared to their 1.5 staple squarebill, the Mega Dawg only made sense for luring the absolute biggest bass around large areas. It's already made a name for itself on fisheries like the Tennessee River. I've been throwing it since the fall of 2018 and have had many memorable catches on it.
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It's a handful

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Jason Sealock
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At 6 inches and 2 ounces, the Strike King Mega Dawg is not your ordinary topwater lure for bass fishing. It takes a pretty hefty rod and reel to handle this lure but it will also get you some of the most savage blow-ups you've ever had in your fishing. 

I fish it on a 7 1/2-foot heavy-power rod with 65-pound Seaguar Smackdown braid and a Lew's Super Duty reel. 

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Quite a step up in size

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Jason Sealock
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As you can see from comparing the Mega Dawg to the Sexy Dawg and Sexy Dawg Jr., it is quite a step up in comparison. But I like that. When I'm fishing a big area, I feel like this bait has a lot more drawing power. I can call a fish from a much greater distance with this lure than I can a small 4 1/2-inch topwater.

I also feel like this bait can draw more attention in a little more chop. I have been able to high stick it in light chop and get it to walk and cut and splash where other topwaters just get pulled under the waves. 

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Easy cutting profile

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Jason Sealock
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The shape and keeling of the Mega Dawg makes it easy to walk with a bigger rod and heavier line. I was afraid because of its size it would wear me out trying to work it, but that has not been the case. It's really not much harder to work than a conventional sized topwater.

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Heavy-duty components

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Jason Sealock
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The split rings are solid as are the VMC hooks. Even with a heavy-power rod, braid and a lot of force, I have not had issues with fish throwing the bait. It actually has been a pretty sticky lure for catching hooking and landing bass thanks to the three hooks and solid components throughout.  

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Great colors

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Jason Sealock
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I am very fond of the Bone, Summer Sexy Shad and Green Gizzard Shad colors as well as the staple Chrome color in the Mega Dawg Line up but honestly I think every color will catch bass in this lineup. 

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Big new option in a proven line

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Jason Sealock
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The original Strike King Sexy Dawg is a bass fishing staple. It catches spots, smallmouth and largemouth equally well. While I think the new Mega Dawg is more suited to chasing apex largemouth, big stripers, muskies and maybe some bigger than average smallmouth, it is a great big new option for trophy hunting anglers.

I've caught plenty of 4-pound bass on this lure. But I throw it because I am looking for that one big kicker on an expansive flat or main river stump field. I'm trying to call the biggest fish out to get an easy injured feast and the Mega Dawg does not disappoint. 

You can find the Strike King Mega Dawg now at the following retailers: 

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First time I ever casted the Mega Dawg

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Jason Sealock
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The very first cast I ever made with the Mega Dawg was off a dock just to see how it walked. That yielded an old beat-up 4 1/2 pound bass. On the very first cast ever with the bait. So I was pretty impressed with its drawing power to say the least right out of the gate. Hopefully you will be too.